Telehealth Physical Therapy: Pros, Cons, & What to Expect - Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy (2022)

Telehealth physical therapy is a great option to get the care you need, virtually. Licensed physical therapists go digital to accommodate patients with different needs and comfort levels. Discover whether virtual physical therapy is the right fit for you.
At the beginning of the pandemic, we were asked the question “Is physical therapy essential?” The medical community responded with a resounding “Yes!”
We’ve continued to stay open, safely, and adjust to the times, continuing to help as many patients as possible.
However, we acknowledge the need for more options, particularly for high-risk patients. And, this is a request we’ve heard from patients with limited time for many years.
Well, here it is: a virtual solution that is quick, inexpensive, and effective!
Many patients have questions about what to expect with virtual care and if it will work for them. I spoke with DPT and clinic director of our Metro Center location, Susie Williams, who has been performing virtual care, to answer our most commonly asked questions and concerns when it comes to virtual care.
Let me tell you, Susie is a gem! Opening her clinic early for at-risk patients, working through her lunch, and always adapting to the latest technology to provide the highest level of care to all of her patients.
It was inspiring to speak with a healthcare provider so passionate about helping her patients. I’m so excited to share with you the details from this amazing conversation. And if you’re in the Metro Center area and looking for care? I cannot recommend Susie enough!

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The Best Care Plan for Telehealth Patients

We’ll get into the ins and outs of virtual care, but let’s get right to the point, shall we? Does virtual physical therapy even work?
The answer may surprise you, but we really believe it does! However, we also believe that the best treatment plan includes a blended approach.
To get the most out of your treatment, we prefer to do an in-person initial evaluation to make sure we can accurately diagnose your injury or condition from the get go. After one-two visits, most patients are able to transition to virtual care moving forward.
We understand that some patients feel less comfortable coming into the clinic. In speaking to Susie and other therapists, I learned that many clinics provide accommodations for high-risk patients, bringing them into the clinic before opening, during lunch, or after closing to mitigate their risk and provide the fewest in-person interactions.
Additionally, clients can also request a private treatment room to avoid sharing the space with other patients.
Patient safety is our #1 concern, and we believe this blended approach offers an innovative solution for patients to begin and continue treatment.

What is Telehealth Physical Therapy?

Telehealth Physical Therapy: Pros, Cons, & What to Expect - Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy (1)
In telehealth physical therapy, you will work with a licensed physical therapist to address your injury and create a rehabilitation plan, just like in-person visits.
The difference? It happens virtually.
In your space. Where you feel comfortable. On your time.
Many patients don’t realize that physical therapy professionals also offer virtual options. While it is newer in practice, as the world changes, we all have to adapt. We’re so proud of the way our therapists have researched, learned, and grown to adapt to a new climate and offer care in a way that’s convenient, effective, and safe.*
*Note: We take the highest precautions to ensure our clinics are safe for the public, including masks, distancing, and all of the sanitizing. We feel strongly that our clinics are safe. However, we respect that physical therapy is not a one-size-fits-all treatment, and we are passionate about providing treatment options for all patients.

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Pros of Telehealth Physical Therapy

There are many reasons virtual physical therapy can be a great choice, pandemic or no pandemic! Let’s take a look at a few of the top reasons patients decide to go virtual.

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  • Peace of mind for high-risk patients. While we take every precaution inside our clinics to keep patients safe, the risk at home is always the smallest. Staying home helps our high-risk patients continue to receive the care they need without the added stress of leaving home.
  • Less expensive. Insurance copays are typically significantly less for virtual care and, sometimes, non-existent! If cost is a concern for your care, virtual PT can be a great solution.
  • Shorter appointments. Much of virtual physical therapy is dependent on you completing your home exercise program outside of your appointment time. This means your appointment times are shorter and easier to squeeze in during the workday.

Cons of Telehealth Physical Therapy

While virtual physical therapy is a great solution, there are a few cons compared to in-person therapy.

  • Difficult diagnosis. While there is a lot we can do virtually, Susie shares that an initial diagnosis is the most difficult thing to achieve virtually. There is something to be said for being able to feel the way your body works in person.
  • Fewer treatment options. While the method of physical therapy is based in strengthening and improving mobility to treat and prevent injuries, there are a lot of great additions to your exercises, such as manual therapy, trigger point dry needling, cupping, and scraping, that you can’t do virtually.
  • More time working solo. Virtual PT eliminates the in-clinic time spent doing your exercises with a technician or assistant. Instead, you spend more time completing exercises on your own and checking in with your therapist to make sure your form is correct. It doesn’t offer the same in-the-moment corrections that you receive in the clinic.

Will Telehealth Physical Therapy Work for Me?

Telehealth Physical Therapy: Pros, Cons, & What to Expect - Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy (2)
Well, it depends.
We wouldn’t offer virtual visits if we didn’t believe in our ability to help patients in this non-traditional format. However, we’re realistic, and we realize virtual sessions are not a fit for every person or every type of session.

Ideal Candidates for Telehealth Physical Therapy

To help you determine whether telehealth is a viable option for your care, Susie helped break it down by who is most likely to see results that are comparable with in-person treatment.

  • Athletes. Not just the pros! When we say athlete, we mean any active individual with heightened body awareness. The more in-tune you are with your body, the more likely you will be to achieve a full recovery, virtually.
  • Passionate & determined patients. We’ve always seen that patients who take an active role in their recovery have the best outcomes. That becomes even more important when your recovery is reliant on your dedication to your home exercise program and following the recommendations of your therapist without the benefit of manual therapy.
  • Technologically-savvy patients. Listen, you don’t need to be a tech wizard to succeed here! What Susie is saying is that patients who are used to Zoom, FaceTime, and other video-related web services typically have an easier time adapting to the technology component.
  • Existing patients. If you’ve already been working with a physical therapist, in most cases, it’s really easy and effective to transfer your sessions to virtual care.
  • Returning patients. If we’ve already worked with you and know your body, it can also help ease the transition to virtual care.

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Ideal Conditions for Telehealth Physical Therapy

Additionally, some injuries and conditions are easier to treat in a virtual setting. Here are the recommendations Susie typically sees success with in a virtual setting:

  • New injuries. Meaning, you haven’t been dealing with this pain untreated for years.
  • Common athletic injuries. Our therapists are pros at treating things like IT band syndrome, Achilles’ tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, and other common athletic injuries that they see daily. The treatment for these is dialed in and easy to adapt.

Less-Than-Ideal Candidates for Telehealth Physical Therapy

Virtual care isn’t appropriate for every patient. The following patients typically do better with a blended (in-person and virtual) approach or strictly in-person care.

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  • Brand new patients. If you’ve never been to physical therapy in person before, it will be more difficult to start out virtually. Ideally, we recommend coming in for one or two in-person visits before transitioning to virtual care.*
  • Lower-activity patients. If you’re not used to daily activity, the learning curve can be a little bit steeper for a home exercise program. It’s always helpful if we can see you once or twice to make sure you feel comfortable before transitioning to virtual care.
  • Less motivated patients. We get it; not everyone loves doing their PT exercises. Coming into the clinic can help motivate patients less inclined to do the work on their own. At the end of the day, it’s your recovery, and you have to take ownership and do the work if you want it to be successful.
  • Anyone unable to use a computer, smart phone, or tablet. We know that the technology gap makes this treatment inaccessible to some patients, and we fully acknowledge that it is unfair to lower-income households. Unfortunately, we do not have the ability to loan out technology to complete these visits at this time. Additionally, if you don’t feel confident using a device, virtual care can be stressful and challenging.

*Don’t stress! If you don’t feel comfortable coming into the clinic at all, we can and will still work with you. If you’re dedicated to your results, there is nothing we can’t fix together!

Less-Than-Ideal Conditions for Telehealth Physical Therapy

Some conditions require more manual therapy or are more difficult to diagnose virtually. The following conditions don’t typically resolve without in-person care.

  • Untreated long-term conditions: For example, if you’ve been experiencing back pain for five years and never sought help for it, it will be difficult to diagnose virtually. This is a time where it’s best to see the patient in person first, then transition to virtual care once we have a clear diagnosis.
  • Post-op. Post-op physical therapy is very specific and requires a lot of manual mobility work. This work is often uncomfortable, making it difficult for patients to do the work on their own. We recommend in-person visits immediately following surgery. You can then discuss transitioning to virtual visits with your therapist when they feel you’re ready.
  • Headaches & migraines. For work on headaches and migraines, we typically provide fewer exercises and more manual therapy. Because we can’t do manual therapy virtually, it’s difficult to truly help patients without working on them in person.

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The Virtual Physical Therapy Process: Step by Step

Telehealth Physical Therapy: Pros, Cons, & What to Expect - Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy (3)
Now that you know a little more about whether you might be a good candidate for virtual physical therapy, let’s talk about the process from start to finish, from preparing for your first appointment through discharge.

How to Prepare for Your Virtual Visit

Preparing for your virtual visit is not unlike preparing for an in-person visit. Just follow these five simple steps, and you’ll be good to go!

  1. Remember to fill your paperwork out ahead of time.
  2. Check your internet connection to make sure you don’t have any connectivity problems.
  3. Dress in comfortable clothing that’s comfortable for exercise and stretching.
  4. Find a quiet, open space with good lighting. You want your therapist to be able to see you well, and you want to make sure you have room to move comfortably.
  5. If this is not your first visit, make sure to have your questions and concerns ready. Even better, write them down so you don’t forget!

What to Expect from Your First Virtual Visit

Your virtual physical therapy visit will be very similar to coming into the clinic. If it’s your first visit, your therapist will perform an injury assessment.
In many cases, therapists can diagnose virtually. However, depending on your injury, your therapist may request that you come in for a quick assessment during a slow time or during off hours in the clinic.
Your therapist will then take you through a series of exercises and make recommendations for which activities are appropriate in your current condition.
If this is a follow-up visit, you will check in with your therapist, discuss how your home exercise program has been going, and ask any questions you have related to your treatment. Your therapist may have you demonstrate some of your exercises to ensure proper form.
The main difference is that your visit will be much shorter since you won’t be working with any technicians or assistants. You can expect initial assessments to take anywhere from 30-60 minutes and follow-up visits to take approximately 15-20 minutes.

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How Frequent are Virtual Visits?

When you first begin your treatment, it’s likely your therapist will want to see you twice a week to make sure everything is going okay and that your recovery is heading in the right direction.
Once we know things are going well, we typically space out visits to every other week.
Of course, if something changes and you need to be seen sooner, we encourage patients to call and make an appointment. We are diligent about making room for same day or next day visits to ensure our patients are receiving the best care possible.

Expected Outcome of Virtual Physical Therapy

Every physical therapist will tell you something a little different here, as some rely more on manual therapy and some are more strength based.
For ideal candidates and conditions, you can expect to see a full recovery from virtual visits. It may take a little longer, as treatments like manual therapy and dry needling can speed up recovery, but the overall outcomes are comparable with in-person treatment.
For patients whose conditions don’t lend themselves to virtual care, we can still see comparable results using a blended approach of very few in-person visits (remember, we will accommodate you during slower times or even off hours!) combined with virtual care.
However, for post-op patients, the outcomes just aren’t as good. We really need to work hands-on with patients immediately following surgery. Still, we’re happy to work to find your comfort zone during slow or off hours or in a private treatment room.

How to Make Your Virtual Care a Success

Telehealth Physical Therapy: Pros, Cons, & What to Expect - Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy (4)
Just like in-person visits, and really, with most things in life, the most important thing you can do to make your virtual care successful is take ownership in your recovery!
Similar to online education, you get out of virtual care what you put in. Here are a few tips to guarantee successful treatment:

  • Do your homework. Seriously. If you don’t do your home exercise program, you won’t get better doing virtual care.
  • Listen to your therapist. If they tell you to stay off your sprained ankle, going for a run the next day is not advised.
  • Bring your questions. With biweekly visits, it’s important to maximize your time with your therapist. Between visits, write down your questions so you remember them and have them ready for your appointment.

Telehealth Physical Therapy FAQs

Will I be able to keep seeing my current therapist?

Yes! Continuity of care is extremely important to us, and we take every measure to ensure you are not passed off between therapists.

How long will my virtual session take?

Initial assessments take 30-60 minutes. Follow-up visits take 15-20 minutes.

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How much will I be charged for my virtual visit?

Telehealth copays are typically lower than in-person visits. Many insurance companies don’t require a copay at all, and Susie said that she hasn’t seen a copay from any insurance company go over $30.
With fewer sessions and lower copays, virtual care is a great option for patients who find care to be cost prohibitive.
If you don’t use insurance, our cash pay fee for virtual care is $35 for sessions under 30 minutes and $70 for sessions 30-60 minutes.

Will I need any special equipment?

Nope! It’s our therapists’ job to make sure you can do everything you need with whatever you have.
Susie will occasionally suggest exercises that require bands. In that case, she will have bands cut, ready, and waiting at the front desk for clients to pick up during slow hours to limit exposure.

Will I get better?

We hope so!
Unfortunately, it’s impossible to answer that without evaluating your individual condition. However, yes, we do see great outcomes using virtual care!

How do I schedule a virtual appointment?

Glad you asked!
You can go directly to our “request a referral” page and select “video conference”. Alternatively, you can call in and request to make a virtual appointment with your therapist.
Telehealth Physical Therapy: Pros, Cons, & What to Expect - Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy (5)

Ready to get started? Schedule your visit (virtual or in-person) today!

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Telehealth Physical Therapy: Pros, Cons, & What to Expect - Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy (6)
Source: Susie Williams, DPT

FAQs

What are the pros and cons of telehealth? ›

Top pros and cons of telehealth
  • Pro: Telehealth minimizes the spread of infectious diseases.
  • Con: It's impossible to conduct a physical exam virtually.
  • Pro: Telehealth is convenient.
  • Con: Regulations can be confusing.
  • Pro: Telehealth can reduce unnecessary ER visits.
12 Jan 2021

How many times a week should you do physical therapy? ›

A typical order for physical therapy will ask for 2-3 visits per week for 4-6 weeks. Sometimes the order will specify something different. What generally happens is for the first 2-3 weeks, we recommend 3x per week. This is because it will be the most intensive portion of your treatment.

What disability are most likely to benefit from physical therapy? ›

neurological conditions, such as stroke, spinal cord injuries, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, vestibular dysfunction, and traumatic brain injuries. pediatric conditions, including cerebral palsy and muscular dystrophy. sports-related injuries, such as concussion and tennis elbow.

What conditions are treated with physical therapy? ›

Some of the most common conditions utilizing physical therapy are:
  • Strokes and other neurological problems.
  • Back and Neck Pain.
  • Limitations in joint range of motion.
  • Industrial and Work related injuries.
  • Sports and recreational injuries.
  • Burns.
  • Post operative orthopedic patients.

What are the downsides of telehealth? ›

Downsides to telehealth

It isn't possible to do every type of visit remotely. You still have to go into the office for things like imaging tests and blood work, as well as for diagnoses that require a more hands-on approach. The security of personal health data transmitted electronically is a concern.

What are two disadvantages of telemedicine? ›

The most obvious disadvantages of virtual care involve the continuing need for clearer, streamlined policies and standards around telehealth practice to enable easier implementation.
  • Regulatory and Industry Barriers. ...
  • Physical Examination is Limited. ...
  • Telemedicine Equipment and Technology.

What time of day is best for physical therapy? ›

The Right Time to Exercise
  • the risk of injury is lowest and physical performance peaks between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m.
  • muscles are strongest between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m.
  • lung function is most efficient in the late afternoon.
  • joints and muscles are most flexible in the early evening.

When should I stop physical therapy? ›

In general, you should attend physical therapy until you reach your PT goals or until your therapist—and you—decide that your condition is severe enough that your goals need to be re-evaluated. Typically, it takes about 6 to 8 weeks for soft tissue to heal, so your course of PT may last about that long.

How do you know if physical therapy is working? ›

Here are some signs that physical therapy is working. You notice how you move. Sometimes the first sign of an improvement is simply an increase in your own awareness of how you move. You may move your body differently or in the way your physical therapist has recommended, rather than the way you used to move.

What is the most common physical therapy? ›

Orthopedics. The most popular physical therapy specialty is orthopedic physical therapy, which involves treating conditions of the bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons and joints.

Is physical therapy worth it for back pain? ›

When you're suffering from back or neck pain, it may be tempting to stay on the couch all day. But that's a prescription for more pain. Although getting up and moving might be the last thing you feel like doing, physical therapy and exercise can be the best way to reduce pain.

Does physical therapy help arthritis? ›

Physical therapy (PT) is a promising treatment option for arthritis. Working with a physical therapist can help you manage symptoms, increase mobility, and improve physical function. They'll also teach you specific exercises and techniques that can allow you to move with less pain and greater ease.

Can a physical therapist diagnose an injury? ›

In most states, physical therapists cannot make a medical diagnosis. This is something that your physician will provide for you. While physical therapists are important members of your medical team, physicians are typically the healthcare providers that will provide you with a medical diagnosis.

How much does physical therapy cost? ›

The national average per session cost of physical therapy can range from $30 - $400. However, with a qualified insurance plan, once your deductible is met, your total out-of-pocket cost typically ranges from $20-$60. If you do not have insurance, you may be paying between $50-$155 out-of-pocket.

What is one of the most common pathologies known to physical therapy? ›

Some common pathologies are chronic, degenerative conditions like arthritis, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, or other disorders, such as diabetes and obesity.

Why are e Visits not recommended for new patients? ›

In fact, the additional office visits appear to crowd out some care to those not using e-visits.” Bavafa also noted that e-visits may result in doctors getting ambiguous or insufficient information that makes it difficult for them to offer a diagnosis, and that those additional communications with doctors create more ...

What are telehealth barriers? ›

Rollback of COVID-19 waivers, coverage and payment policies (77 percent) Lack of insurer coverage of telehealth services (76 percent) Low or no reimbursement (64 percent) Technology challenges for my patient population (54 percent)

Is telehealth as good as in-person? ›

The quality is often the same.

You can get the same high level of care from home as you would in your doctor's office. In one survey, nearly 63% of patients and almost 60% of doctors said they thought virtual visits were just as effective as in-person ones.

What are 3 benefits of using telemedicine in healthcare? ›

Definitive Guide to Telemedicine
  • No transportation time or costs. ...
  • No need to take time off of work. ...
  • Eliminate child or elder care issues. ...
  • On-demand options. ...
  • Access to Specialists. ...
  • Less Chance of Catching a New Illness. ...
  • Less Time in the Waiting Room. ...
  • Better Health.

Is telehealth better than an office visit? ›

62 percent of patients said the quality of telehealth visits was just as good as in-person visits; 21 percent said it was even better. Lee Schwamm, MD, director of the MGH Center for Telehealth, said the findings confirm that “what patients value most is uninterrupted time with their doctor.”

What are three different types of telemedicine? ›

There are three main types of telemedicine, which include store-and-forward, remote monitoring, and real-time interactive services. Each of these has a beneficial role to play in overall health care and, when utilized properly, can offer tangible benefits for both healthcare workers and patients.

How many times a day should you do physical therapy exercises? ›

For the treatment to be effective, we highly recommend performing these exercises around 3 to 5 times a week for 2 to 3 weeks.

Do you tip your physical therapist? ›

I'm in PT school now but in the past have worked as an LMT in similar settings, and have known many other LMTs who did as well. It is commonplace for people to tip LMTs whether or not they are patients with insurance coverage. In general, some patients tip while others don't, and there is no expectation either way.

Why do people stop going to physical therapy? ›

Physical therapy might stop if the patient isn't seeing results or making progress within the time-frame their physical therapist thinks they should be. After all, it can be frustrating to attend regular appointments, perform all the instructed exercises and still not make progress toward your goals.

Does physical therapy get worse before it gets better? ›

Physical therapy is a common and legitimate treatment option for many different conditions, injuries, as well as surgery recovery. Physical therapy is aimed at improving symptoms and pain, but sometimes patients experience worsening symptoms after engaging in physical therapy exercises.

How many people quit physical therapy? ›

But as Heidi Jannenga, PT, DPT, ATC/L, the president and co-founder of WebPT, explains here, “approximately 20% of PT patients drop out of treatment within the first three visits, and 70% fail to complete their full course of care.” If that number frustrates you—and it should—know that you're not alone.

How long does it take for physical therapy to start working? ›

Muscle can take up to two to four weeks. Tendon can take up to four to six weeks. Bone can take up to six to eight weeks. Ligaments can take up to ten to twelve weeks.

Can too much physical therapy be harmful? ›

Signs your physical rehab program may be overdoing it include: Muscle failure while trying to tone and strengthen your body. Muscle soreness two days after a workout or rehab session. Excessive or “therapeutic” bruising from a deep tissue massage.

Why do I feel sick after physical therapy? ›

A common cause for feeling sick after a workout is simply trying to push yourself too hard when your body isn't ready for it. Whether you're just starting out or work out six times a week, work out at your own level. That doesn't mean that you shouldn't push yourself to reach a new level, but do it carefully.

What are the 5 types of physical therapy? ›

The field of physical therapy has sub-specialties in five distinct practice areas:
  • Orthopedic. Orthopedic physical therapy focuses on restoring function to the musculoskeletal system, including joints, tendons, ligaments and bones. ...
  • Geriatric. ...
  • Neurological. ...
  • Cardiopulmonary. ...
  • Pediatric.

What are 5 things physical therapist do? ›

5 Surprising Ways a Physical Therapist Can Help You
  • Heart Attack Recovery. ...
  • Jaw, Head, and Neck Pain Reduction. ...
  • Retrain Your Brain. ...
  • Breathe Easier. ...
  • Hold Your Pee Better. ...
  • Are You Looking for a Physical Therapist Near San Jose You Can Trust?

What is the best exercise for back pain? ›

Walking, swimming, and biking may all help reduce back pain. Start with short sessions and build up over time. If your back is hurting, try swimming, where the water supports your body. Avoid any strokes that twist your body.

What do you wear for lower back physical therapy? ›

If you need therapy for a lower back condition, you can wear a loose T-shirt or shoulder tank top. Put on loose pants with an adjustable waistband. Avoid wearing clothing that uses a leather belt and wear athletic shoes, so you can perform exercises without getting hurt.

How long does physical therapy take for lower back pain? ›

But on average, patients can expect to be in physical therapy for six to eight weeks as strength and mobility progress with every session. If your back pain continues to be severe or even worse, physical therapy may take longer or may be recommended after surgical intervention.

What is the best exercise for someone with arthritis? ›

Walking, biking, swimming, tai chi, yoga, and water aerobics are all good aerobic exercises for people with osteoarthritis. Water exercise is especially ideal because of water's soothing warmth and buoyancy. It's a gentle way to exercise joints and muscles -- plus it acts as resistance to help build muscle strength.

What type of physical therapy activities are good for arthritis? ›

Low-impact aerobic activities do not put stress on the joints and include brisk walking, cycling, swimming, water aerobics, light gardening, group exercise classes, and dancing.

What type of therapy is good for arthritis? ›

Therefore, people with arthritis often benefit from physical therapy. A physical therapist can teach you how to work out stiffness without further damaging your joint. Physical therapy also is useful after an injury, such as from a fall, and after joint surgery, especially for artificial joint replacement.

Should an MRI be done before physical therapy? ›

In the vast majority of cases, you do not need a MRI or X-ray prior to coming to physical therapy. Your physical therapist is qualified to assess your condition, determine a diagnosis, and create a specialized treatment plan to restore strength, function, and mobility.

What are the most three common diseases that physiotherapy deals with and obtains excellent treatment results? ›

Here are the most common medical conditions treated by physical therapists:
  • Lymphedema. Excess fluids gather in the lymphatic system, which then moves around in the bloodstream, causing swelling. ...
  • Sports Injuries. ...
  • Muscular Dystrophy. ...
  • Back and Neck Pain. ...
  • Limited Range of Motion (ROM) ...
  • Osteoporosis. ...
  • Vertigo. ...
  • Headaches.
22 Jan 2020

Can a PT read an MRI? ›

Many PTs have access to diagnostic ultrasound right in the clinic, and in some practice settings like the military, and certain ACOs, therapists have the ability to order imaging like x-rays, CT scans and MRIs. The research indicates that PTs are effective in using their ability to order imaging when it exists.

How many times a week should you go to physical therapy? ›

A typical order for physical therapy will ask for 2-3 visits per week for 4-6 weeks. Sometimes the order will specify something different. What generally happens is for the first 2-3 weeks, we recommend 3x per week. This is because it will be the most intensive portion of your treatment.

How long is a physical therapy session? ›

Apart from the frequency, each session may last between 30 and 60 minutes in length. While two to three visits in a week may appear to be too much, especially if you have just sustained an injury or undergone surgery, it is important to understand why regular visits are necessary.

How much is physical therapy for knee? ›

The average cost of receiving physical therapy without health insurance is now $75 to $150 per session. The actual price you pay depends on the type and severity of the injury. The standard out-of-pocket fee for a single evaluation assessment is $150.

Which type of disability are most likely to benefit from physical therapy? ›

neurological conditions, such as stroke, spinal cord injuries, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, vestibular dysfunction, and traumatic brain injuries. pediatric conditions, including cerebral palsy and muscular dystrophy. sports-related injuries, such as concussion and tennis elbow.

What is the most common physical therapy? ›

Orthopedics. The most popular physical therapy specialty is orthopedic physical therapy, which involves treating conditions of the bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons and joints.

What is the difference between a physical therapist and a Dr of physical therapy? ›

A Physical Therapist, a PT, is a licensed healthcare professional that completed a graduate program to help patients reduce pain and restore or improve mobility. A DPT, Doctor of Physical Therapy, is now the entry level for the professional degree for physical therapists.

What is the key benefit of telehealth? ›

To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, flu and other infectious diseases, doctors can use telehealth appointments to prescreen patients for possible infectious disease. It also saves sick people from having to come in to the office.

What are 3 benefits of using telemedicine in healthcare? ›

Definitive Guide to Telemedicine
  • No transportation time or costs. ...
  • No need to take time off of work. ...
  • Eliminate child or elder care issues. ...
  • On-demand options. ...
  • Access to Specialists. ...
  • Less Chance of Catching a New Illness. ...
  • Less Time in the Waiting Room. ...
  • Better Health.

What are telehealth barriers? ›

Rollback of COVID-19 waivers, coverage and payment policies (77 percent) Lack of insurer coverage of telehealth services (76 percent) Low or no reimbursement (64 percent) Technology challenges for my patient population (54 percent)

What is telehealth good for? ›

Telehealth is especially helpful to monitor and improve ongoing health issues, such as medication changes or chronic health conditions. Your health care provider will decide whether telehealth is right for your health needs.

Who might benefit from telehealth? ›

Groups that might be especially likely to benefit from telehealth include: People who live in rural areas with limited access to medical care. People who need to see a specialist (like a dermatologist) but do not have one in their area. People who are transgender or non-binary.

When should telehealth be used? ›

So, telehealth services may be a good option for you if your concerns are convenience, medication refills, or lab results. Additionally, a virtual healthcare visit can help you if you are experiencing one or more of the following symptoms: Allergies. Arthritis.

Is telehealth as good as in person? ›

The quality is often the same.

You can get the same high level of care from home as you would in your doctor's office. In one survey, nearly 63% of patients and almost 60% of doctors said they thought virtual visits were just as effective as in-person ones.

Why are e Visits not recommended for new patients? ›

In fact, the additional office visits appear to crowd out some care to those not using e-visits.” Bavafa also noted that e-visits may result in doctors getting ambiguous or insufficient information that makes it difficult for them to offer a diagnosis, and that those additional communications with doctors create more ...

What is the difference between telemedicine and telehealth? ›

Telehealth is different from telemedicine in that it refers to a broader scope of remote health care services than telemedicine. Telemedicine refers specifically to remote clinical services, while telehealth can refer to remote non-clinical services.

What is the biggest barrier to telehealth? ›

What Are The Biggest Barriers to Telehealth Implementation?
  • Cost of implementation.
  • Complexity of implementation and use.
  • Reimbursement structure cost.
  • Disadvantages compared to face-to-face interactions.
  • Problems with lack of existing infrastructure.

Does telehealth improve patient outcomes? ›

Across clinical topics, outpatient telehealth consultations consistently improved access and reduced the number of visits and hospital admissions, and some studies reported improved clinical or psychiatric outcomes.

What is the most serious issue facing telehealth providers and their patients quizlet? ›

Which of the following are issues associated with the practice of telehealth and telenursing? Rationale: Reimbursement, patient privacy and confidentiality and licensure and liability are all issues with the practice of telehealth and telenursing.

How do I prepare for a telehealth visit? ›

How to Prepare for a Telehealth Appointment: Tips for Older Adults
  1. Add online appointments to your calendar. ...
  2. Try to use the best camera you can find. ...
  3. Test the camera in advance. ...
  4. Test the sound and video on your device. ...
  5. Use the best internet connection possible. ...
  6. Charge your device. ...
  7. Find a quiet space and adjust lighting.
26 Aug 2020

What are the 4 types of telehealth? ›

Today, telehealth encompasses four distinct applications. These are commonly known as live video, store-and-forward, remote patient monitoring, and mobile health. Explore each modality in detail to learn more. Live, two-way interaction between a person and a provider using audiovisual telecommunications technology.

Is telehealth a phone or video? ›

Most telehealth visits will include video. All you will need for this is a smartphone or a device with an internet connection and audio-video capabilities, like a tablet or computer.

Videos

1. The data on how PT private practices actually held up during 2020 and what’s on the horizon
(Jarod Carter)
2. Jake Awender - Physical Therapy Sports Residency Insight
(Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast)
3. CashPT Lunch Hour Podcast From Broke to Making $40K in 1 Week Brandon Smith
(Aaron LeBauer)
4. A low-stress way to start a Cash-based Practice — with Jason Racca
(Jarod Carter)
5. #GetToKnowCIO – Dr. Kile Carter, Primary Care Sports Medicine Doctor
(Central Indiana Orthopedics)
6. Watch knee replacement using the MAKO Robotic arm
(Panorama Orthopedics & Spine Center)

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