Student Engagement as Influenced by Physical Activity and Student Motivation Among College Students (2022)

Student Engagement as Influenced by Physical Activity and Student Motivation Among College Students

The strict implementation of Covid – 19 Health Protocol limits the human movements including physical activities. The educational system also shifts from traditional to flexible learning modality. This quantitative study aimed to determine the degree of influence of physical activity and student motivation in student engagement among college students. The regression analysis technique was utilized to determine the degree of the relationship between the two independent variables and a dependent variable. The researcher applied the cluster sampling technique in selecting the respondents. After the thorough investigation, the null hypothesis (p<0.05) were rejected. This study delineated that physical activity and student motivation have positively influenced student engagement. Among the three indicators in physical activity, physical education got the highest mean of 4.28 (very high), followed by a general attitude, which posted a mean of 4.23 (very high), and scientific basis, which attained a mean of 4.13 (high). Moreover, among the four indicators in student motivation, intrinsic value got the highest mean of 4.20 (very high), followed by self-regulation with a mean of 4.10 (high), cognitive strategy with a mean of 4.07 (high), and lastly, self-efficacy which got the lowest mean score of 3.68 (high). The study accentuated that physical activity and student motivation are critical to promoting student academic engagement among college students. The results will contribute to the improvement of student engagement which is deemed essential in academic success.

MAED–Physical Education, Physical Activity, Student Motivation, Student Engagement, Philippines

Jeric Escosio Suguis, Saramie Suraya Belleza, Student Engagement as Influenced by Physical Activity and Student Motivation Among College Students, International Journal of Sports Science and Physical Education. Volume 7, Issue 1, March 2022 , pp. 28-40. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsspe.20220701.15

Copyright © 2022 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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FAQs

How does motivation affect student engagement? ›

One of the impacts of motivation is that it is often seen as a pre-requisite to higher level of student engagement during the learning process. Higher levels of education attainment by a student correlates to a higher level of engagement during the learning process (Saeed & Zyngier, 2012) . ...

Why engaging in physical activity is important to the students? ›

Regular physical activity can help children and adolescents improve cardiorespiratory fitness, build strong bones and muscles, control weight, reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression, and reduce the risk of developing health conditions such as: Heart disease.

What is the most significant reason for students to engage in physical education? ›

Physical education provides cognitive content and instruction designed to develop motor skills, knowledge, and behaviors for physical activity and physical fitness. Supporting schools to establish physical education daily can provide students with the ability and confidence to be physically active for a lifetime.

What is the difference between student motivation and engagement? ›

One way of distinguishing these two concepts is to suggest that: “Motivation is about energy and direction, the reasons for behaviour, why we do what we do. Engagement describes energy in action; the connection between person and activity” (Russell, Ainley, & Frydenberg, under review).

What is the relationship between motivation and engagement? ›

Engagement is a sense of purpose, belonging, and commitment to an organization, whereas motivation is the willpower and drive to act on those feelings. Employee engagement serves as a foundation for your employees to do their best work, while motivation is the fuel or energy required to actually do it.

How can we improve student motivation and learning engagement? ›

A List Of Simple Ideas To Improve Student Motivation
  1. Give students a sense of control. ...
  2. Be clear about learning objectives. ...
  3. Create a threat-free environment. ...
  4. Change your scenery. ...
  5. Offer varied experiences. ...
  6. Use positive competition. ...
  7. Offer rewards. ...
  8. Give students responsibility.

How does physical activity impact academic performance? ›

According to the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), physical activity has an impact on cognitive skills such as concentration and attention, and it also enhances classroom attitudes and behaviors, all of which are important components of improved academic performance.

What are the impact of physical education to you as a student? ›

PE improves motor skills and increases muscle strength and bone density, which in turn makes students more likely to engage in healthy activity outside of school. Furthermore it educates children on the positive benefits of exercise and allows them to understand how good it can make them feel.

What is the benefit of physical fitness for university students? ›

Regular cardiovascular exercise can help! In college if you get sick you miss class or lower concentration, and being ill can seriously throw you off during an exam. Spending 20-30 minutes at least 3 times a week exercising has been shown to help prevent sickness and make for better grades.

Why physical education is important in college? ›

Physical Education (PE) develops students' competence and confidence to take part in a range of physical activities that become a central part of their lives, both in and out of school. A high-quality PE curriculum enables all students to enjoy and succeed in many kinds of physical activity.

Why physical education is important in school give three reasons? ›

There are several reasons why a student must involve in physical educational activities, they are; It improves the learning aptitude of the students. Improves cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, mobility, and body consumption.

Why is physical education important for youth give any three reasons? ›

Physical education teaches how to acquire ability to develop strength, speed, endurance and coordination abilities. It also emphasises on achieving social qualities, such as, empathy, cooperation, friendliness, team spirit, and respect for rules, which are essential for healthy social relations with others.

Why is motivation and engagement important? ›

Strong employee motivation and engagement are critical to the health and success of your organization. In fact, engaged employees are 69 percent more likely to be productive. With a disengaged and unmotivated workforce, productivity plummets and business outcomes are less common.

What is the relationship between motivation and student learning? ›

Indeed, successful learning activities promote strong motivation; learning activities without motivation tend not to convey the expected effect. Learning motivation is the most important driving force of learning behavior, as it facilitates learners to actively engage with the learning content.

How motivation and engagement in the learning environment can influence self regulated learners? ›

Students who are motivated to reach a certain goal will engage in self-regulatory activities they feel will help them achieve that goal. The self-regulation promotes learning, which leads to a perception of greater competence, which sustains motivation toward the goal and to future goals.

What are some examples of forces that drive motivation and engagement? ›

13 factors of motivation
  • Leadership style. ...
  • Recognition and appreciation. ...
  • Meaning and purpose. ...
  • Positive company culture. ...
  • Professional development opportunities. ...
  • Job advancement opportunities. ...
  • Financial benefits. ...
  • Flexible work schedules.

How does motivation orientation influences level of engagement? ›

Numerous research studies have shown that intrinsically motivated students have higher achievement levels, lower levels of anxiety and higher perceptions of competence and engagement in learning than students who are not intrinsically motivated (Wigfield & Eccles, 2002; Wigfield & Waguer, 2005).

What are some forces that drive motivation and engagement? ›

These include food, water, air, shelter and sleep. As long as a human hasn't satisfied their most needs, they won't be motivated enough to seek the others. Hence, these basic needs are the most crucial driving forces behind human motivation.

How do you motivate students to succeed in college? ›

  1. Hold high but realistic expectations for your students.* ...
  2. Help students set achievable goals for themselves. ...
  3. Tell students what they need to do to succeed in your course. ...
  4. Strengthen students' self-motivation. ...
  5. Avoid creating intense competition among students. ...
  6. Be enthusiastic about your subject.

How do you motivate students to participate in activities? ›

How do I encourage participation?
  1. Foster an ethos of participation. ...
  2. Teach students skills needed to participate. ...
  3. Devise activities that elicit participation. ...
  4. Consider your position in the room. ...
  5. Ask students to assess their own participation. ...
  6. Ensure that everyone's contributions are audible.

What is the most effective way to motivate students? ›

Top 5 Strategies for Motivating Students
  1. Promote growth mindset over fixed mindset. ...
  2. Develop meaningful and respectful relationships with your students. ...
  3. Grow a community of learners in your classroom. ...
  4. Establish high expectations and establish clear goals. ...
  5. Be inspirational.
4 Jun 2018

Why is it important to engage and motivate learners? ›

Research has demonstrated that engaging students in the learning process increases their attention and focus and motivates them to engage in higher-level critical thinking.

How motivation and engagement in the learning environment can influence self regulated learners? ›

Students who are motivated to reach a certain goal will engage in self-regulatory activities they feel will help them achieve that goal. The self-regulation promotes learning, which leads to a perception of greater competence, which sustains motivation toward the goal and to future goals.

Which factors in assessment promote student engagement and motivation? ›

Active learning in groups, peer relationships, and social skills are key components to engagement and motivation.

What are student motivations? ›

Student motivation is defined as a process where the learners' attention becomes focused on meeting their scholastic objectives and their energies are directed towards realising their academic potential (Christophel, 1999; Lepper, Greene & Nisbett, 1973).

How do you motivate students to succeed in college? ›

  1. Hold high but realistic expectations for your students.* ...
  2. Help students set achievable goals for themselves. ...
  3. Tell students what they need to do to succeed in your course. ...
  4. Strengthen students' self-motivation. ...
  5. Avoid creating intense competition among students. ...
  6. Be enthusiastic about your subject.

How do you motivate students to participate in activities? ›

How do I encourage participation?
  1. Foster an ethos of participation. ...
  2. Teach students skills needed to participate. ...
  3. Devise activities that elicit participation. ...
  4. Consider your position in the room. ...
  5. Ask students to assess their own participation. ...
  6. Ensure that everyone's contributions are audible.

What are examples of student engagement? ›

Students demonstrate behavioral engagement through actions such as consistent attendance, completing assignments, coming to class prepared, and participating in class and in school activities. Students are emotionally engaged when they like school, are interested in, and identify with school culture.

How does learning environment affect motivation? ›

Students are likely to learn better when they perceive their classroom environment positively. Creating an academic environment that fosters a sense of belonging, perception of competence, and offers student autonomy, will result in increased motivation to learn.

What is self-motivation explain with the help of an example? ›

To be specific, self-motivation is the internal drive that leads us to take action towards a goal. It keeps us moving forward, even when we don't want to. An example of this is when you're going for a run. You set a goal to run for 20 minutes, but at 15 minutes you're exhausted. You want to stop.

What are some ways to help improve learners motivation for self-regulated learning? ›

How-to Instruction for Self-Regulated Learning Strategies
  1. Guide learners' self-beliefs, goal setting, and expectations. ...
  2. Promote reflective dialogue. ...
  3. Provide corrective feedback. ...
  4. Help learners make connections between abstract concepts. ...
  5. Help learners link new experiences to prior learning.

What is student engagement and motivation in assessment? ›

In education, student engagement refers to the degree of attention, curiosity, interest, optimism, and passion that students show when they are learning or being taught, which extends to the level of motivation they have to learn and progress in their education.

What factor is most influential to child engagement in school? ›

Parents are the most influential factor in a child's education according to MIT's The Review of Economics and Statistics. Children work harder when parents put ongoing effort into their schooling.

What factors contributed to your student's lack of engagement? ›

There are many possible reasons for a lack of engagement in the classroom. Often these are non-school related. For example, not getting enough sleep, spending too much time with peers or screens, having too many extra-curricula activities, 'issues' at home, or simply being 'lazy'.

How do you motivate and motivate students? ›

Here are some strategies that can be used in the classroom to help motivate students:
  1. Promote growth mindset over fixed mindset. ...
  2. Develop meaningful and respectful relationships with your students. ...
  3. Grow a community of learners in your classroom. ...
  4. Establish high expectations and establish clear goals. ...
  5. Be inspirational.
4 Jun 2018

What are benefits of motivation? ›

Finding ways to increase motivation is crucial because it allows us to change behavior, develop competencies, be creative, set goals, grow interests, make plans, develop talents, and boost engagement.

Videos

1. Active Students, Engaged Learners
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2. ISE Webinar - Can I have your attention? Why student engagement is a challenge this autumn
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(NewHope Church)
4. Motivational strategies – Keeping students engaged in real and virtual classrooms by Jo Dossetor
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5. How to Stop A Bully
(Brooks Gibbs)
6. Teamwork can make a Dreamwork - best ever motivational short film on youtube
(Inhouse Incorporation)

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