Re-engaging disengaged pupils in physical education: An appreciative inquiry perspective (2022)

Abstract

Many children and young people enjoy physical education (PE), yet many do not, and subsequently become disengaged from PE. Previous research that has explored pupil disengagement from PE has focused on what teachers should do to re-engage their pupils, or has encouraged dis-engaged pupils to create a curriculum that they perceive to be socially and culturally relevant. While this research is extremely important, it does not highlight enough what teachers bring to the teaching and learning process. An alternative approach to understanding (dis)engagement in PE is to start by asking both teachers and pupils: what is currently working, why is it working, and what could be in the future? This ‘appreciative inquiry’ (AI) approach is underpinned by the belief that everyone and everything has strengths that can be developed, and that those strengths should be the starting point for change. Consequently, in establishing the use of AI as an important means of understanding and potentially enhancing PE pedagogy, this research sought to understand the successful teaching strategies developed by PE teachers to re-engage disengaged pupils. Importantly, in recognising the value of understanding pupil experiences we also explored and shared the success stories of the ‘re-engaged’ pupils. Finally, in extending the research in this area, we examined the impact that teacher engagement in the AI process had on their professional learning. As the teachers engaged in the AI process, they discussed, listened to (each other and their pupils), reflected and shared their success stories. This, in turn, appears to have encouraged them to re-articulate and re-enact their practice and learning within the context of a more positive future. They designed (and in some cases, co-design with their pupils) meaningful and empowering PE programmes for their ‘disengaged’ pupils and have subsequently made a commitment to future professional learning and inquiry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-255
Number of pages15
JournalSport, Education and Society
Volume24
Issue number3
Early online date6 Sep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • pedagogy
  • trust
  • appreciative inquiry
  • physical education
  • success

Access to Document

  • GraySES2017ReEngagingDisengagedPupilsInPhysical

    This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Sport, Education and society on 6th September 2017, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13573322.2017.1374942

    Accepted author manuscript, 230 KBLicence: All Rights Reserved

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Re-engaging disengaged pupils in physical education: An appreciative inquiry perspective'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    View full fingerprint

    • Re-engaging disengaged pupils in physical education: An appreciative inquiry perspective (1)

      Shirley Gray

        • Moray House School of Education and Sport - Senior Lecturer
        • Academy of Sport
        • Institute for Sport, Physical Education and Health Sciences

        Person: Academic: Research Active

      Cite this

      • APA
      • Author
      • BIBTEX
      • Harvard
      • Standard
      • RIS
      • Vancouver

      Gray, S., Treacy, J., & Hall, E. T. (2019). Re-engaging disengaged pupils in physical education: An appreciative inquiry perspective. Sport, Education and Society, 24(3), 241-255. https://doi.org/10.1080/13573322.2017.1374942

      Gray, Shirley ; Treacy, Jennifer ; Hall, Edward Thomas. / Re-engaging disengaged pupils in physical education : An appreciative inquiry perspective. In: Sport, Education and Society. 2019 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 241-255.

      (Video) State Board Meeting - March 13, 2020

      @article{f1ff74165b694c4d8fe0b5f542302fe4,

      title = "Re-engaging disengaged pupils in physical education: An appreciative inquiry perspective",

      abstract = "Many children and young people enjoy physical education (PE), yet many do not, and subsequently become disengaged from PE. Previous research that has explored pupil disengagement from PE has focused on what teachers should do to re-engage their pupils, or has encouraged dis-engaged pupils to create a curriculum that they perceive to be socially and culturally relevant. While this research is extremely important, it does not highlight enough what teachers bring to the teaching and learning process. An alternative approach to understanding (dis)engagement in PE is to start by asking both teachers and pupils: what is currently working, why is it working, and what could be in the future? This {\textquoteleft}appreciative inquiry{\textquoteright} (AI) approach is underpinned by the belief that everyone and everything has strengths that can be developed, and that those strengths should be the starting point for change. Consequently, in establishing the use of AI as an important means of understanding and potentially enhancing PE pedagogy, this research sought to understand the successful teaching strategies developed by PE teachers to re-engage disengaged pupils. Importantly, in recognising the value of understanding pupil experiences we also explored and shared the success stories of the {\textquoteleft}re-engaged{\textquoteright} pupils. Finally, in extending the research in this area, we examined the impact that teacher engagement in the AI process had on their professional learning. As the teachers engaged in the AI process, they discussed, listened to (each other and their pupils), reflected and shared their success stories. This, in turn, appears to have encouraged them to re-articulate and re-enact their practice and learning within the context of a more positive future. They designed (and in some cases, co-design with their pupils) meaningful and empowering PE programmes for their {\textquoteleft}disengaged{\textquoteright} pupils and have subsequently made a commitment to future professional learning and inquiry.",

      keywords = "pedagogy, trust , appreciative inquiry , physical education , success",

      author = "Shirley Gray and Jennifer Treacy and Hall, {Edward Thomas}",

      year = "2019",

      month = mar,

      day = "24",

      doi = "10.1080/13573322.2017.1374942",

      language = "English",

      volume = "24",

      pages = "241--255",

      journal = "Sport, Education and Society",

      issn = "1357-3322",

      publisher = "Taylor & Francis",

      (Video) Understanding transformative pedagogy.

      number = "3",

      }

      Gray, S, Treacy, J & Hall, ET 2019, 'Re-engaging disengaged pupils in physical education: An appreciative inquiry perspective', Sport, Education and Society, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 241-255. https://doi.org/10.1080/13573322.2017.1374942

      Re-engaging disengaged pupils in physical education : An appreciative inquiry perspective. / Gray, Shirley; Treacy, Jennifer; Hall, Edward Thomas.

      In: Sport, Education and Society, Vol. 24, No. 3, 24.03.2019, p. 241-255.

      Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

      TY - JOUR

      T1 - Re-engaging disengaged pupils in physical education

      T2 - An appreciative inquiry perspective

      AU - Gray, Shirley

      AU - Treacy, Jennifer

      AU - Hall, Edward Thomas

      PY - 2019/3/24

      (Video) Panel Discussion: Holistic Lab Learning: Building Transferable Skills and Confidence in Students

      Y1 - 2019/3/24

      N2 - Many children and young people enjoy physical education (PE), yet many do not, and subsequently become disengaged from PE. Previous research that has explored pupil disengagement from PE has focused on what teachers should do to re-engage their pupils, or has encouraged dis-engaged pupils to create a curriculum that they perceive to be socially and culturally relevant. While this research is extremely important, it does not highlight enough what teachers bring to the teaching and learning process. An alternative approach to understanding (dis)engagement in PE is to start by asking both teachers and pupils: what is currently working, why is it working, and what could be in the future? This ‘appreciative inquiry’ (AI) approach is underpinned by the belief that everyone and everything has strengths that can be developed, and that those strengths should be the starting point for change. Consequently, in establishing the use of AI as an important means of understanding and potentially enhancing PE pedagogy, this research sought to understand the successful teaching strategies developed by PE teachers to re-engage disengaged pupils. Importantly, in recognising the value of understanding pupil experiences we also explored and shared the success stories of the ‘re-engaged’ pupils. Finally, in extending the research in this area, we examined the impact that teacher engagement in the AI process had on their professional learning. As the teachers engaged in the AI process, they discussed, listened to (each other and their pupils), reflected and shared their success stories. This, in turn, appears to have encouraged them to re-articulate and re-enact their practice and learning within the context of a more positive future. They designed (and in some cases, co-design with their pupils) meaningful and empowering PE programmes for their ‘disengaged’ pupils and have subsequently made a commitment to future professional learning and inquiry.

      AB - Many children and young people enjoy physical education (PE), yet many do not, and subsequently become disengaged from PE. Previous research that has explored pupil disengagement from PE has focused on what teachers should do to re-engage their pupils, or has encouraged dis-engaged pupils to create a curriculum that they perceive to be socially and culturally relevant. While this research is extremely important, it does not highlight enough what teachers bring to the teaching and learning process. An alternative approach to understanding (dis)engagement in PE is to start by asking both teachers and pupils: what is currently working, why is it working, and what could be in the future? This ‘appreciative inquiry’ (AI) approach is underpinned by the belief that everyone and everything has strengths that can be developed, and that those strengths should be the starting point for change. Consequently, in establishing the use of AI as an important means of understanding and potentially enhancing PE pedagogy, this research sought to understand the successful teaching strategies developed by PE teachers to re-engage disengaged pupils. Importantly, in recognising the value of understanding pupil experiences we also explored and shared the success stories of the ‘re-engaged’ pupils. Finally, in extending the research in this area, we examined the impact that teacher engagement in the AI process had on their professional learning. As the teachers engaged in the AI process, they discussed, listened to (each other and their pupils), reflected and shared their success stories. This, in turn, appears to have encouraged them to re-articulate and re-enact their practice and learning within the context of a more positive future. They designed (and in some cases, co-design with their pupils) meaningful and empowering PE programmes for their ‘disengaged’ pupils and have subsequently made a commitment to future professional learning and inquiry.

      KW - pedagogy

      KW - trust

      KW - appreciative inquiry

      KW - physical education

      KW - success

      U2 - 10.1080/13573322.2017.1374942

      DO - 10.1080/13573322.2017.1374942

      M3 - Article

      VL - 24

      SP - 241

      EP - 255

      JO - Sport, Education and Society

      JF - Sport, Education and Society

      SN - 1357-3322

      IS - 3

      ER -

      (Video) The Future of Wellbeing: A Conversation with Deepak Chopra

      Gray S, Treacy J, Hall ET. Re-engaging disengaged pupils in physical education: An appreciative inquiry perspective. Sport, Education and Society. 2019 Mar 24;24(3):241-255. https://doi.org/10.1080/13573322.2017.1374942

      FAQs

      How do you motivate disengaged learners? ›

      How to successfully support disengaged learners
      1. Support students to notice how much they did. Towards the end of the last school year, some students totally unplugged. ...
      2. Encourage them to reflect. ...
      3. Help them turn reflections into actions.
      2 Sept 2020

      How would you encourage a pupil to engage in learning? ›

      Keeping your students focussed on lessons
      1. Make the activity appropriate and well-matched. If your activities are not appropriate for your pupils, they are less likely to find them interesting. ...
      2. Give a choice of ways to learn. ...
      3. Have some brain breaks. ...
      4. Build in some movement opportunities. ...
      5. Offer rewards for finishing early.

      What does disengagement look like in the classroom? ›

      School disengagement is when a student doesn't actively participate in class or school activities, is not engaged in subject content, feels as though they don't belong, and/or exhibits inappropriate behaviour that reduces their likelihood of academic success.

      How do you help students who have been disengaged by learning gaps? ›

      Learning gaps can be bridged over time.
      ...
      Here's a few ideas:
      1. Have your students draw what they understand about a topic or concept.
      2. Play icebreaking games that test students' knowledge.
      3. Use a writing game for a quick snapshot of students' writing, spelling, handwriting and language conventions.
      30 Jan 2020

      How do you engage students who don't want to participate? ›

      What Are The Best Ways To Engage Reluctant Learners?
      1. Proactively get to know and connect with each student.
      2. Foster community and collaboration by design.
      3. Make interactive learning experiences the norm.
      4. Whenever possible, provide choice.
      5. Build an off-ramp.

      How do you motivate your students in your class when they are not engaged? ›

      Your Weekly Eureka Moment
      • Find Things They're Interested In. ...
      • Move Them to the Heart of the Class. ...
      • Ask Them to Help You With Something (Anything!) ...
      • Pull Them Aside and Offer to Give a Second Chance. ...
      • Send a Positive Note to Their Parents.
      28 Sept 2015

      How can we try to engage a demotivated pupil? ›

      Here's some ways to motivate the unmotivated student and help them achieve the academic success they deserve.
      1. What Causes Lack Of Motivation? ...
      2. Low Self-Esteem. ...
      3. Too Much Pressure. ...
      4. Positive Encouragement. ...
      5. Build on Strengths. ...
      6. Allow Students to Make Their Own Choices. ...
      7. Connect Learning to Real Life. ...
      8. Introduce Role Models.
      3 Dec 2019

      What happens when students become disengaged? ›

      Some students who are disengaged or lacking motivation may hide learning difficulties or giftedness to fit in with peers. Disengaged students are not necessarily unmotivated to achieve in all subjects. They may be disengaged in one particular class or across several subjects.

      Why is it important to engage and motivate learners? ›

      Engaged learners are motivated, inspired, and willing to invest effort in learning. In other words, they are a dream to teach. Luckily, while there are almost as many barriers to learner engagement as there are benefits, they can be eliminated with a few smart learner engagement strategies.

      What ideas can we try to help a pupil who is struggling compared with their peers? ›

      Five principles for supporting struggling learners
      • Know individual students. Effective teachers know their students. ...
      • Plan according to the developmental levels of students. ...
      • Model instruction and follow up with students. ...
      • Assess students throughout the lesson. ...
      • Provide consistent one-on-one or small group interventions.
      8 Jan 2020

      What interactive activities keep learners engaged during a lesson? ›

      Interactive Classroom Activities
      • Entry/Exit Tickets. ...
      • Free Writing/Minute Paper/Question of the Day Exercise. ...
      • Ice Breakers. ...
      • Think–Pair–Share. ...
      • Case Studies and Problem-Based Learning. ...
      • Debate. ...
      • Interview or Role Play. ...
      • Interactive Demonstrations.

      How do you motivate a disadvantaged student? ›

      What you can do
      1. Treat students equally; disadvantaged students can perform to the same standard as their advantaged counterparts and progress to university.
      2. Make sure students are signed up to get free meals. ...
      3. Encourage all students to get enough sleep. ...
      4. Offer counselling. ...
      5. Set up mentoring for students and teachers.
      31 Jan 2019

      What are engaging activities? ›

      Here are 14 creative ways to engage students in discussions, problem-solving, critical thinking, and more:
      • Assumption Busting. ...
      • Brain-sketching. ...
      • Brainstorming. ...
      • Concept Mapping. ...
      • Exaggeration. ...
      • Fishbone. ...
      • Laddering. ...
      • Negative (or Reverse) Brainstorming.

      What interactive activities keep learners engaged during a lesson? ›

      Interactive Classroom Activities
      • Entry/Exit Tickets. ...
      • Free Writing/Minute Paper/Question of the Day Exercise. ...
      • Ice Breakers. ...
      • Think–Pair–Share. ...
      • Case Studies and Problem-Based Learning. ...
      • Debate. ...
      • Interview or Role Play. ...
      • Interactive Demonstrations.

      Videos

      1. Dr. Sarah Fine: Deep Learning
      (Citizenship Center)
      2. Friday SLO Talk Grand Finale May 2022
      (Jarek Janio)
      3. Andy Hair #ESPEchat #PhysEdSummit
      (ESPECHAT)
      4. Inquiry in Education - A More Beautiful Question
      (Perkins Educational Consulting)
      5. Crash Course on the Draft Curriculum: Part 2
      (Carla Peck)
      6. Getting—and Then Keeping—Students Engaged
      (The Lifelong Educator)

      Top Articles

      You might also like

      Latest Posts

      Article information

      Author: Merrill Bechtelar CPA

      Last Updated: 10/07/2022

      Views: 6045

      Rating: 5 / 5 (70 voted)

      Reviews: 85% of readers found this page helpful

      Author information

      Name: Merrill Bechtelar CPA

      Birthday: 1996-05-19

      Address: Apt. 114 873 White Lodge, Libbyfurt, CA 93006

      Phone: +5983010455207

      Job: Legacy Representative

      Hobby: Blacksmithing, Urban exploration, Sudoku, Slacklining, Creative writing, Community, Letterboxing

      Introduction: My name is Merrill Bechtelar CPA, I am a clean, agreeable, glorious, magnificent, witty, enchanting, comfortable person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.