Detecting the Signs: Hyperglycemia vs. Hypoglycemia (2022)

Detecting the Signs: Hyperglycemia vs. Hypoglycemia (1)What does it mean to experience hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia? How can you recognize the symptoms of both, intervene early, and prevent serious episodes of high and low blood sugar?

If you were recently diagnosed with diabetes, you undoubtedly have heard the terms hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia from your healthcare team. And if you’ve had diabetes for some time now, it’s always good to get a refresher on the basics! There is no doubt that one of the main goals of diabetes management is to avoid both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is the hallmark of diabetes onset, and it usually continues to occur on and off after you start treatment. On the other hand, hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) occurs as the result of diabetes treatment, particularly insulin administration.

The two conditions fall on opposite ends of the glucose spectrum; your blood glucose is constantly rising and falling as a result of diabetes, its many therapies, and your lifestyle. Since both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia pose significant long-term and short-term challenges, it’s important to understand what causes them, how to recognize the symptoms of each, and how to prevent and treat them.

What is Hyperglycemia?

Hyperglycemia (or high blood sugar) and its accompanying symptoms are often what lead to a diabetes diagnosis (fasting glucose greater than 126 mg/dL, blood glucose level above 200 mg/dL, or an A1C above 6.4%).

Once you are diagnosed with diabetes and have started a treatment plan, the goal for most people is to spend as much time as possiblein rangewith glucose levels between 70 and 180 mg/dL; when you start to approach or go above 180 mg/dL, that is considered hyperglycemia. If you are pregnant, the target is lower and you should aim to keep your glucose below 140 mg/dL as much as possible.

Hyperglycemia can occur for a number of reasons:

  • Insufficient insulin, due to missed doses, or too low a dose for what is needed at the time, or not enough of your other diabetes medications

  • Not enough physical activity (physical activity encourages the body to use glucose and makes the body more sensitive to insulin)

  • Too much food, particularly food containing high levels of carbohydrates (especially those withfast carbs)

  • Illness

  • Stress

  • Other medications and other medical conditions

Although most people with diabetes cannot avoid some high glucose levels, it is important to try to keep them at a minimum for two main reasons. First, prolonged, or persistent, hyperglycemia can lead to majorhealth complicationscaused by damage to blood vessels and nerves, which can affect your eyes, heart, kidneys, and other organs. Second, mainly in type 1 diabetes (but also in some people with type 2 diabetes), significant and persistent hyperglycemia indicates you missed one or more doses of insulin or that the doses of insulin you took were insufficient to meet the needs of your body; if this persists, it can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA, or high levels of ketones in your blood). For more information on DKA, read “Ketosis vs. Ketoacidosis: what’s the Difference.”

Detecting the Signs: Hyperglycemia vs. Hypoglycemia (2)What is Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia (or low blood sugar) occurs when your glucose value drops below 70 mg/dL; serious hypoglycemia occurs below 54 mg/dL. Hypoglycemia is usually caused by too much insulin or insulin effect in the body. Here are some reasons why hypoglycemia might occur:

  • Too much insulin administered for your body’s needs at the time

  • Too high levels of other diabetes medications

  • Not enough food, particularly carbohydrates

  • Too much exercise

  • Illness, particularly if associated with vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea

  • Other medical conditions

Hypoglycemia can be quite dangerous, and in extreme cases it can cause you to become confused or even to lose consciousness (when there is not enough glucose for the brain to adequately function). Most people with diabetes are able to recognize the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia as their glucose levels are trending low before severe hypoglycemia occurs. These warning signs are due to the release of other body hormones (mainly the hormone adrenaline) that alerts you to oncoming hypoglycemia.

(Video) Hypoglycemia vs Hyperglycemia

Some people experiencehypoglycemia unawareness(which can also be called reduced hypoglycemia awareness) – this means the body doesn’t release the hormones or respond to the warning signals of hypoglycemia, putting them at a heightened risk of prolonged low glucose levels and glucose levels below which the brain can properly function. Several factors can increase the risk of being unaware of hypoglycemic episodes including having repeated episodes of hypoglycemia, going low while sleeping, exercise,consuming alcohol, having specific diabetes complications (like neuropathy), or taking certainprescription drugs. Because hypoglycemia unawareness more often occurs in those who were diagnosed with diabetes decades before, in addition to the risk factors mentioned, is more commonly occurs in people over the age of 65.

There are three levels of hypoglycemia: level 1, glucose values less than 70 mg/dL;level 2, glucose levels less than 54 mg/dL;and level 3, severe hypoglycemia, which is characterized by altered mental state or the need for someone to help you totreat the extreme low.

Time in Range Goals – Stay Out of the Highs and the Lows

Effective diabetes management is an attempt to stay in the target glucose range. This means that you should aim to spend as much time as possible with your glucose level between 70 to 180 mg/dL The amount of time you spend in this target zone is called your Time in Range (TIR) and is measured by a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), though you can also measure TIR using yourblood glucose meter. When glucose level exceeds 180 mg/dL, this is referred to as Time Above Range (TAR). If your glucose level goes below 70 mg/dL, this is Time Below Range (TBR).

For most people with diabetes, these are the recommended TIR goals (If you have gestational diabetes, are pregnant and you have type 1 diabetes, or are elderly or high-risk, your TIR goals maydiffer):

These are general recommendations, however, you should strive for even more TIR and less Time Above and Below Range if possible.

What are the Symptoms?

While it can sometimes be easy to recognize signs and tell the difference between hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, at other times it can be hard to tell them apart because of some overlap. For example, confusion and headaches can occur in both cases. Try to be aware of any symptoms you experience that can help you differentiate between the two conditions. And talk to your care team to see if getting a CGM is something that could benefit you. CGM is a great tool to help you know when you are too high or too low.

Though not everyone experiences all of these symptoms every time, and it may take time to learn to recognize these symptoms quickly, here is what can occur with hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia:

Hyperglycemia

(due to lack of insulin or insulin resistance)

Hypoglycemia

(due to the release of other body hormones)

Severe Cases of Hypoglycemia

(due to too little glucose in the brain)

Confusion

Headache

Frequent and excessive urination

(Video) Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia Nursing Mnemonics, Nursing School Study Tips

Extreme thirst

Dry mouth

Blurry vision

Weakness

Shortness of breath

Nausea

Confusion

Headache

Irritability

Trouble concentrating

Fatigue

Hunger

Sweating

Shaking

Fast heartbeat

Confusion

Combativeness

Disorientation

Seizures

Loss of consciousness

Coma

(Video) Hypoglycemia: Definition, Identification, Prevention, and Treatment

How Do You Treat Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia?

The purpose of diabetes management is to regulate high and low glucose levels when they occur.Here are some strategies you might use to treat these conditions –it’s best to discuss these with your healthcare team before trying them.

Hyperglycemia

Hypoglycemia

If you are on insulin, you may need to take a correction dose if your glucose level is too high, after discussing with your health care team.

Be sure you didn’t skip any diabetes medications.

Drink more water.

Exercise – for example, you can go on a walk to bring your glucose levels down. Be sure to check your glucose level prior to exercising. If you are above 240 mg/dL, check your urine for ketones. If ketones are present, DO NOT exercise as this can make your glucose levels rise even higher.

Make sure that you stick to your medication regimen. Talk to your healthcare professional if this regimen is not keeping your glucose in range.

Have anemergency hypoglycemia kitthat is easily accessible and with you at all times. Make sure people you are with know what to do in a hypoglycemic emergency.

Use the 15-15 rule. Eat or drink 15 grams ofcarbohydrates (glucose tablets, 4 oz of juice, 1 tablespoon of sugar or honey, small hard candies, etc.)to raise your blood sugar. Check it after 15 minutes. If it’s still below 70 mg/dL, have another serving of 15 grams of carbs. Repeat these steps until your blood sugar is at least 70 mg/dL. Once your blood sugar is back in range, you might consider eating a snack with little or no insulin to make sure it doesn’t drop again. If you use a closed loop device, discuss with your health care team if you should take less than 15 grams to correct a low glucose value.

In severe cases, when a person is vomiting or not able to cooperate, coordinate swallowing, or fully conscious, glucagon should be used to treat hypoglycemia. Glucagon is a natural hormone that tells the body to release stored sugar into the bloodstream. Emergency glucagon is available by prescription and can be injected or inhaled.

How to Recognize an Emergency Situation?

Hyperglycemia can become an emergency if you begin to develop symptoms of DKA: shortness of breath, fruity-smelling breath, nausea and vomiting, confusion, or you lose consciousness. Likewise, hypoglycemia requires emergency care if you begin to experience confusion, a loss of consciousness, or seizures. Emergency glucagon can be an important addition to your emergency hypoglycemia kit. Learn more about emergency glucagonhere.

If you start experiencing symptoms of DKA or severe hypoglycemia, or if a loved one notices signs of these symptoms, seek medical care immediately.

Talk to your healthcare team if you are experiencing frequent episodes of hyperglycemia and/or hypoglycemia, if your glucose is consistently above 240 mg/dL, or anytime you experience severe hypoglycemia.

How to Prevent Going Too Low or Too High?

The best way to prevent glucose levels that are too high or too low is to practice careful diabetes management, checking your glucose often (either through self-monitoring of blood glucose, or if you are able to, with a CGM), and learning how to recognize the symptoms of both.

Try to get in the habit of checking your glucose:

  • Any time you have symptoms of hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia

  • Before and after meals

  • Before and after exercise

  • During exercise if it’s a long session

  • Before bed

    (Video) Lesson 3: High vs. Low Blood Sugar (English)

  • In the middle of the night if you did intense exercise during the day

  • When you are sick

  • More frequently when aspects of your diabetes management routine change, such as new insulin or medication regimens, a new work schedule, an increase in physical activity, or traveling (especially across time zones)

It’s important to look at episodes of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia as data points that can help you learn to prevent or reduce their frequency and severity. This data can also help you and your care team identify when a change to your diabetes care plan is needed such as a new medication or arefined approachto nutrition, exercise, or other lifestyle factors. By learning how to recognize the signs of both and by checking your glucose as often as is possible for you, you can catch hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia before they become severe.

About the authors

Matthew Garza

Matthew Garza joined the diaTribe Foundation as an associate in 2020 where he worked on diaTribe Learn and the dSeries Executive Innovation Labs. In February 2022, he helped launch dStigmatize.org...Read the full bio »

FK

Francine Kaufman

Francine Kaufman, MD is Chief Medical Officer at Senseonics, a medical technology company focused on the development and commercialization of a long-term, implantable continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system for people...Read the full bio »

(Video) Recognizing the signs of Type I diabetes in kids

FAQs

What are the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia? ›

Symptom comparison chart
Blood sugar levelSymptoms
Hypoglycemiahunger irritability trouble concentrating fatigue sweating confusion fast heartbeat shaking headache
Hyperglycemiaextreme thirst dry mouth weakness headache frequent urination blurry vision nausea confusion shortness of breath
22 Jul 2020

How do you remember the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia? ›

When I need to remember the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia is use these: “Cold and clammy need some candy” – Hypoglycemia. “High and dry, sugar high” – Hyperglycemia.

What 5 things should you look for to identify hyperglycemia? ›

Common symptoms include:
  • feeling very thirsty.
  • peeing a lot.
  • feeling weak or tired.
  • blurred vision.
  • losing weight.

Why is it important to recognize signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia? ›

If you ignore the symptoms of hypoglycemia too long, you may lose consciousness. That's because your brain needs glucose to function. Recognize the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia early, because if untreated, hypoglycemia can lead to: Seizures.

What is the difference between hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic? ›

Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), refers to abnormally elevated levels of glucose in the blood1, whereas hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) indicates low levels of glucose in the blood (less than 70 mg/dL)2. While hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia may sound similar, they have different symptoms, triggers and health effects.

What are the 3 signs of hyperglycemia? ›

Frequent urination. Increased thirst. Blurred vision. Feeling weak or unusually tired.

Can you have hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia at the same time? ›

Are Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia The Same? While hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are both conditions that can occur under diabetes, one cannot have both conditions at the same time. Hyperglycemia means high in blood sugar whereas the latter is low in blood sugar.

How do you test for hyperglycemia? ›

Hyperglycemia, otherwise known as high blood sugar, can be diagnosed with a blood test such as a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) test, an A1C test, or a fructosamine test.

How do you test for hypoglycemia? ›

If you have signs or symptoms of low blood sugar, check your blood sugar level with a blood glucose meter — a small device that measures and displays your blood sugar level. You have hypoglycemia when your blood sugar level drops below 70 mg/dL (3.9 mmol/L ).

Which are symptoms of hyperglycemia select all that apply? ›

Early symptoms of hyperglycemia include: High blood sugar. Increased thirst and/or hunger. Blurred vision.
...
Symptoms of ketoacidosis are:
  • Vomiting.
  • Dehydration.
  • Unusual fruity smell on the breath.
  • Deep labored breathing or hyperventilation.
  • Rapid heartbeat.
  • Confusion and disorientation.
  • Coma.
11 Feb 2020

What is considered hyperglycemia? ›

If someone has readings over 7.8 mmol/l (140 mg/dl), they are considered to have hyperglycemia. These high blood sugar levels mainly occur if there isn't enough insulin or the insulin doesn't work properly. Without the effect of insulin, the organs can't make good use of the sugar in the blood, so the sugar builds up.

What's the difference between hypoglycemia and diabetes? ›

Hypoglycemia sets in when blood sugar levels are too low. This is usually a side effect of treatment with blood-sugar-lowering medication. Diabetes is a metabolic disease with far-reaching health effects. In type 1 diabetes, the body only produces very little insulin, or none at all.

What are the 5 symptoms of hypoglycemia? ›

Symptoms
  • Looking pale.
  • Shakiness.
  • Sweating.
  • Headache.
  • Hunger or nausea.
  • An irregular or fast heartbeat.
  • Fatigue.
  • Irritability or anxiety.
4 May 2022

What are the key nursing responsibilities when treating hypoglycaemia? ›

It is the nurse's responsibility to assess for signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, as indicated above, and to report any abnormal findings. It is also the nurse's responsibility to assess that medications are taken as prescribed and report any possible side effects of hypoglycemia.

Which is worse hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia? ›

BeatO Health Coach Madhuparna Pramanick says “The brain cells stop working without glucose, thus making hypoglycemia more dangerous than hyperglycemia & it needs immediate intervention.

Can you be hyperglycemic and hypoglycemic? ›

People with brittle diabetes have severe swings in blood glucose (blood sugar). The swings can cause frequent episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Brittle diabetes is sometimes called labile diabetes or unstable diabetes.

What is the difference between hypoglycemia and hypoglycemic? ›

Hypoglycemia occurs when there is not enough glucose in your blood. It usually comes on suddenly and can happen after strenuous exercise or when you've waited too long to eat. Strictly speaking, you're considered hypoglycemic when your blood glucose levels are less than 70 mg/dl.

What hypoglycemia means? ›

Low blood glucose, also called low blood sugar or hypoglycemia, occurs when the level of glucose in your blood drops below what is healthy for you. For many people with diabetes, this means a blood glucose reading lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). 1.

What are the levels of hypoglycemic reactions? ›

Here are the levels: Level 1 (mild) hypoglycemia: Blood glucose is less than 70 mg/dL but is 54 mg/dL or higher. Level 2 (moderate) hypoglycemia: Blood glucose is less than 54 mg/dL. Level 3 (severe) hypoglycemia: A person is unable to function because of mental or physical changes due to low blood glucose.

What are complications of hypoglycemia? ›

Severe hypoglycemia can cause accidents, injuries, coma, and may even prove fatal. Recent studies have associated severe hypoglycemia as a risk factor for dementia, falls, fractures, and heart attacks. The simplest solution under hypoglycemic conditions is to provide a sugar source to the patient.

How do you treat hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia? ›

Consume 15 g of fast-acting carbohydrates, such as 4 ounces of juice or regular soda (NOT diet), 1 tablespoon of jelly or sugar, or 3 glucose tablets.

How can you tell the difference between hypoglycemic coma and hyperglycemic coma? ›

Some of the key differences between hypoglycemia vs hyperglycemia are: Hypoglycemia is abnormally low levels of blood glucose (lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter). Hyperglycemia is abnormally high levels of blood glucose (fasting plasma glucose ≥126 milligrams per deciliter on two separate tests).

Is insulin given for hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia? ›

Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is the hallmark of diabetes onset, and it usually continues to occur on and off after you start treatment. On the other hand, hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) occurs as the result of diabetes treatment, particularly insulin administration.

How can you test for hyperglycemia at home? ›

Prick the side of your fingertip with the lancet provided with your test kit. Gently squeeze or massage your finger until a drop of blood forms. Touch and hold the edge of the test strip to the drop of blood. The meter will display your blood glucose level on a screen after a few seconds.

What is the causes of hypoglycemia? ›

Taking too much insulin. Not eating enough carbs for how much insulin you take. Timing of when you take your insulin. The amount and timing of physical activity.

What is done for hyperglycemia? ›

Changes to your insulin program or a supplement of short-acting insulin can help control hyperglycemia. A supplement is an extra dose of insulin used to help temporarily correct a high blood sugar level. Ask your health care provider how often you need an insulin supplement if you have high blood sugar.

How do they test for hypoglycemia in non diabetics? ›

How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed?
  1. Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia.
  2. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. ...
  3. An oral glucose tolerance test may be done.
31 Aug 2022

How is hypoglycemia diagnosed without diabetes? ›

Your doctor can diagnose non-diabetic hypoglycemia by reviewing your symptoms, doing a physical exam, looking at your risk for diabetes, and checking your blood glucose level. Your doctor will also see whether you feel better after you eat or drink to raise your glucose to a normal level.

How do you treat hypoglycemia symptoms? ›

If you have hypoglycemia symptoms, do the following: Eat or drink 15 to 20 grams of fast-acting carbohydrates. These are sugary foods or drinks without protein or fat that are easily converted to sugar in the body. Try glucose tablets or gel, fruit juice, regular (not diet) soda, honey, or sugary candy.

What are sudden signs of hyperglycemia? ›

Symptoms of hyperglycaemia include:
  • increased thirst and a dry mouth.
  • needing to pee frequently.
  • tiredness.
  • blurred vision.
  • unintentional weight loss.
  • recurrent infections, such as thrush, bladder infections (cystitis) and skin infections.
1 Nov 2021

Which of the following is a symptom of hypoglycemia? ›

feeling hungry. tingling lips. feeling shaky or trembling. a fast or pounding heartbeat (palpitations)

What causes hyperglycemia? ›

Hyperglycemia is the technical term for high blood glucose (blood sugar). High blood glucose happens when the body has too little insulin or when the body can't use insulin properly.

What are the first warning signs of type 2 diabetes? ›

Early Signs and Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes
  • More thirst. When sugar builds up in your blood, your kidneys work overtime to get rid of it. ...
  • More hunger. ...
  • Peeing often. ...
  • Dry mouth. ...
  • Weight loss without trying. ...
  • Fatigue. ...
  • Blurry vision. ...
  • Headaches.
7 Dec 2021

What are the 3 most common symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes? ›

The three most common symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes include increased thirst, increased urination, and increased hunger. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that happens when blood sugar (glucose) is too high (hyperglycemia).

What happens when a Type 2 diabetic eats too much sugar? ›

If you have diabetes, too much sugar can lead to kidney damage. The kidneys play an important role in filtering your blood. Once blood sugar levels reach a certain amount, the kidneys start to release excess sugar into your urine.

What causes hyperglycemia in non diabetics? ›

Nondiabetic hyperglycemia usually occurs after the body has undergone some type of trauma or stressful event. It usually resolves when the root of the injury or stressful event improves, but this is not always the case.

Can you have hypoglycemia without diabetes? ›

Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. Clinicians usually want to confirm non-diabetic hypoglycemia by verifying classic symptoms along with a low sugar level AND that these symptoms recover after eating sugar.

Is hyperglycemia the same as diabetes? ›

Hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose, is a symptom that characterizes diabetes. Insufficient insulin production, resistance to the actions of insulin, or both can cause diabetes to develop. When a person eats carbohydrates, the body breaks them down into simple sugars that enter the bloodstream.

Which type of diabetes is hypoglycemia? ›

Low blood glucose is common for people with type 1 diabetes and can occur in people with type 2 diabetes taking insulin or certain medications. The average person with type 1 diabetes may experience up to two episodes of mild low blood glucose each week, and that's only counting episodes with symptoms.

How do you treat an unconscious patient with hypoglycemia? ›

Hypoglycaemia which causes unconsciousness or fitting is an emergency
  1. In hypoglycaemia, if sugar cannot be given by mouth, glucagon can be given by injection. ...
  2. Carbohydrates should be given as soon as possible to restore liver glycogen.
27 Apr 2022

What is Priority nursing diagnosis for hypoglycemia? ›

Nursing Diagnosis: Unstable Blood Glucose Level related to insufficient checking of blood sugar levels and lack of compliance to proper diabetes management secondary to hypoglycemia as evidenced by fatigue and tremors.

How do you educate a patient with hypoglycemia? ›

Eat meals at regular times. If recommended by your health care provider, have snacks between meals. Do not skip or delay meals or snacks. You can be at risk for hypoglycemia if you are not getting enough carbohydrates.

What is the symptoms of hypoglycemia? ›

Common symptoms may include:
  • Fast heartbeat.
  • Shaking.
  • Sweating.
  • Nervousness or anxiety.
  • Irritability or confusion.
  • Dizziness.
  • Hunger.
25 Mar 2021

Can you have both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia? ›

Are Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia The Same? While hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are both conditions that can occur under diabetes, one cannot have both conditions at the same time. Hyperglycemia means high in blood sugar whereas the latter is low in blood sugar.

What are the 9 signs and symptoms of high blood sugar? ›

Early signs and symptoms
  • Frequent urination. When blood sugar levels are high, the kidneys try to remove the excess sugar by filtering it out of the blood. ...
  • Increased thirst. ...
  • Frequent hunger. ...
  • Fatigue. ...
  • Blurry vision. ...
  • Slow healing of cuts and wounds. ...
  • Tingling, numbness, or pain in the hands or feet. ...
  • Patches of darker skin.

How do you know you are hypoglycemic? ›

feeling hungry. tingling lips. feeling shaky or trembling. a fast or pounding heartbeat (palpitations)

What hypoglycemia means? ›

Low blood glucose, also called low blood sugar or hypoglycemia, occurs when the level of glucose in your blood drops below what is healthy for you. For many people with diabetes, this means a blood glucose reading lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). 1.

What causes hyperglycemia? ›

Hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose, occurs when there is too much sugar in the blood. This happens when your body has too little insulin (the hormone that transports glucose into the blood), or if your body can't use insulin properly.

How can you prevent hypoglycemia? ›

Preventing Hypoglycemia
  1. Follow your meal plan.
  2. Eat at least three evenly spaced meals each day with between-meal snacks as prescribed.
  3. Plan your meals no more than 4 to 5 hours apart.
  4. Exercise 30 minutes to 1 hour after meals. ...
  5. Double-check your insulin and dose of diabetes medicine before taking it.
27 Jan 2022

How do you test for hyperglycemia? ›

Hyperglycemia, otherwise known as high blood sugar, can be diagnosed with a blood test such as a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) test, an A1C test, or a fructosamine test.

How is hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia treated? ›

Treatment
  1. Get physical. Regular exercise is often an effective way to control blood sugar. ...
  2. Take your medication as directed. ...
  3. Follow your diabetes eating plan. ...
  4. Check your blood sugar. ...
  5. Adjust your insulin doses.
20 Aug 2022

Which is worse hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia? ›

BeatO Health Coach Madhuparna Pramanick says “The brain cells stop working without glucose, thus making hypoglycemia more dangerous than hyperglycemia & it needs immediate intervention.

What are 10 warning signs of diabetes? ›

Some of the symptoms of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are:
  • Feeling more thirsty than usual.
  • Urinating often.
  • Losing weight without trying.
  • Presence of ketones in the urine. ...
  • Feeling tired and weak.
  • Feeling irritable or having other mood changes.
  • Having blurry vision.
  • Having slow-healing sores.
9 Aug 2022

What are the 3 most common symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes? ›

The three most common symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes include increased thirst, increased urination, and increased hunger. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that happens when blood sugar (glucose) is too high (hyperglycemia).

What are the 7 warning signs of diabetes? ›

They may develop slowly over time, causing many adults to fail to recognize key symptoms.
  • 1) Frequent Urination. ...
  • 2) Increased Thirst or Dry Mouth. ...
  • 3) Unexpected Weight Loss. ...
  • 4) Persistent Hunger. ...
  • 5) Foot Pain and Numbness. ...
  • 6) Frequent Infections and Feminine Health Issues. ...
  • 7) Blurred Vision.
7 Nov 2018

What is difference between hypoglycemia and diabetes? ›

Hypoglycemia sets in when blood sugar levels are too low. This is usually a side effect of treatment with blood-sugar-lowering medication. Diabetes is a metabolic disease with far-reaching health effects. In type 1 diabetes, the body only produces very little insulin, or none at all.

What range is hypoglycemia? ›

Hypoglycemia is the medical term used when the amount of glucose (sugar) in someone's blood is lower than 70 mg/dL, with symptoms and signs noted above.

What is the range for hyperglycemia? ›

This is equivalent to a blood sugar concentration of between 3.3 and 7.8 mmol/l. “Millimoles per liter” (mmol/l) is the unit that blood sugar is measured in. It describes the amount of a certain substance per liter. If someone has readings over 7.8 mmol/l (140 mg/dl), they are considered to have hyperglycemia.

Videos

1. Low Blood Sugar vs High Blood Sugar
(Doctablet)
2. Hypoglycaemia - How to Treat and Prevent Low Blood Sugar
(SingHealth)
3. Caring for Your Diabetic Cat Part 6 - Recognizing and Treating Hypoglycemia
(Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine)
4. High and Low Blood Sugar Symptoms
(Diabetes.co.uk)
5. What is hypoglycemia? - DiaBiteSize
(St. Michael's Hospital)
6. Hyperglycemia - Causes, symptoms and treatment of hyperglycemia
(Diabetes.co.uk)

Top Articles

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Laurine Ryan

Last Updated: 12/15/2022

Views: 6321

Rating: 4.7 / 5 (57 voted)

Reviews: 80% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Laurine Ryan

Birthday: 1994-12-23

Address: Suite 751 871 Lissette Throughway, West Kittie, NH 41603

Phone: +2366831109631

Job: Sales Producer

Hobby: Creative writing, Motor sports, Do it yourself, Skateboarding, Coffee roasting, Calligraphy, Stand-up comedy

Introduction: My name is Laurine Ryan, I am a adorable, fair, graceful, spotless, gorgeous, homely, cooperative person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.